Month: February 2017

When ‘Mum’ Seems Anxious

When ‘Mum’ Seems Anxious

A guest blog by Helen and Jack’s Mum

‘I suspect the problem is her Mum who is really overanxious’. ‘I only spoke to Mum once but she seemed very over stressed’.

I knew what was being said about me in that meeting because my friend was sat there, not as my friend but in her role as a teacher from another school.  She told them she knew me socially and she had already asked me if it was OK to stay in the room while ‘We’ were being discussed by the meeting.  I had said it was OK for her to be there – she knew it all anyway and looking back now with hindsight, I’m so glad I had one person sat there believing what I said was true.  I also had one person who was brave enough to tell me what was truly said at the meeting.  At least I knew what they really thought. Continue reading “When ‘Mum’ Seems Anxious”

SEN Support in Schools – We’re Missing the Point

SEN Support in Schools – We’re Missing the Point

Every school-age child with a special educational need (SEN) should have a written plan of support.  Every single one.  That is my interpretation of the SEN Code of Practice (SEN COP) and I will explain why. 

Published in June 2014, Chapter 6 of the SEN COP describes the provision of SEN Support in Schools.  It describes a system that is far removed from the days of Individual Education Plans and from setting targets for children who are not achieving someone else’s idea of ‘good enough’ progress.

The new approach talks about children fulfilling their potential, about achieving their best.  It talks about understanding barriers to learning and providing support.  Critically, nowhere, anywhere, does it talk about targets.  Implied is: ‘make the environment right for the child and they will progress’.  Continue reading “SEN Support in Schools – We’re Missing the Point”

The Penny Dropping

The Penny Dropping

A guest post by Rosie and Jo’s Dad

That sound you can hear, it’s a penny dropping.

When Rosie was first diagnosed with Asperger’s, people kept explaining things she was finding difficult, how she saw the world in a different way, how she wasn’t picking up on “normal” clues and therefore communication was difficult and this was increasing her anxiety. When Jo started on the same journey more things were highlighted; executive function (it’s taken me 3 weeks to get round to typing this), deep all consuming interests and a desire to get away from social situations and have time on her own. The fact that they wanted these things or had these characteristics wasn’t a massive shock to me, the fact that other people didn’t and that they were considered “different” was.

Continue reading “The Penny Dropping”

The Absence of Critical Thinking

The Absence of Critical Thinking

The best education I received was led by exceptional Nurse Teachers and Leaders.  They had PhDs and they taught us to think, question and evaluate carefully the information that was presented to us.

Yesterday a bizarre collection of statements was compiled in a document and published, then seemingly inadequate reporting of this followed making me aware again, of just how fortunate I have been with this element of my education.

It struck me that both the document and the reporting of its findings by the media lack the most basic levels of critical thinking.  

Take this for example: Continue reading “The Absence of Critical Thinking”